Can't Compile

Mar 13, 2008 at 3:29 PM
Hello, I've recently downloaded a copy of TigerMUD from SVN, doing everything as told such checking out to C:\ etc..
However, I can not get it to compile, and I get strange errors when entering Visual C# Express 2005 also, such as:

The application for project 'C:\trunk\tigermud\Setup\Setup1.vdproj' is not installed.
Make sure the application for the project type(.vdproj) is installed.

and:

Solution folders are not supported in this version of Visual Studio.
Soultion folder 'Solution Items' will be displayed as unavailable.

After I open the solution, when I try to compile the projects, even after compiling TigerLIB first, I get a whole slew of errors, 108 to be exact!

What am I doing wrong? I would love to try this out but the docs included with the download are, to say the least, very sparse and even somewhat outdated.(For instance, TigerMUD is no longer hosted on sourceforge). Any help would be very appreciated, thanks!
Coordinator
Mar 14, 2008 at 12:18 AM
You can ignore the setup1.vdproj error, it is about the files needed to create a deployment project and we intentionally left those out, it doesn't stop the compiler and you should be fine.

But the solution items folder error is a blocker error for you and must be due to a change I recently made. None of us use Express versions so that's probably why we missed it so far, but we're now using a great feature that is apparently not available in the free version of Visual Studio (Solution Items). I become more disappointed by the Express versions the more I learn about them. You can't do any serious programming and basically can only dabble with C# using them.

Adam




Mar 14, 2008 at 2:03 PM
Edited Mar 14, 2008 at 3:43 PM
Ah, well that makes sense then. I do have Visual Studio 2005 Standard Edition, when I get time I'll install that and see what happens. Thank you!

-Dave

EDIT: As a side note, is it still possible to use SharpDevelop successfully with this project, or is it too closely tied with a full version of Visual Studio that any attempt to use a different compiler would result in headaches? The reason I ask is my friend and I have been administering and developing on a MUD written in C for about 7-8 years, and after I've been tinkering with C# for a small while we realized how much better using a managed language would be, along with all the features the C# language provides. Recently I've set out to find a base written in C# to save us having to write our own, and TigerMUD fits most of our criteria so far The only problem I forsee is the fact that my friend develops on Macintosh, so needless to say it is more of a hassle for him to use Visual Studio. =)

EDIT 2:
Another question, as I haven't had much experience with subversioning. Is it possible even after I've made modifications to the existing base if there was an addition/modification that was commited I would be able to update the base on my PC without messing with my changes also?

Thanks!
Mar 15, 2008 at 2:38 PM
Just wanted to say it compiled perfectly in Visual Studio '05 Standard.
Coordinator
Mar 15, 2008 at 9:06 PM


EDIT: As a side note, is it still possible to use SharpDevelop successfully with this project, or is it too closely tied with a full version of Visual Studio that any attempt to use a different compiler would result in headaches?


Good news. Yes, see my post on SharpDevelop 2.2.


Another question, as I haven't had much experience with subversioning. Is it possible even after I've made modifications to the existing base if there was an addition/modification that was commited I would be able to update the base on my PC without messing with my changes also?


Yes, there are two ways to deal with this. Source control supports automatic source merging so that changes that you and someone else make will live together properly. In the case of a direct source change conflict which is fairly rare (you both edit the same line in conflciting ways), most clients can pop-up WinMerge or similar tools to let you manually merge the changes in a way that works properly. Creating source branches is also possible so that you can have a tigermud source trunk, and a few branches like "adam's prototype" branch and other things that live separately. It really is only useful to do that when other people really need to collaborate with you on those subversions, otherwise I'd store them locally because of the management overhead necessary to handle the subversions.

cheers
adam